Mower Positioning

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A typical robot lawn mower on the market today. It’s basically a Roomba, but for your lawn. Have fun tearing up your lawn to bury cable!

When you google “robot lawn mower” you will find a bunch of Roomba looking robots like the one above. The missing ingredient between these robots and the one I’m attempting to make is one thing: positioning.

When you need your lawn mowed, you want it to be mowed 100%. You don’t want half the lawn cut and the other half not cut. You don’t want gaps of uncut grass between your stripes. You don’t want random paths cut through your lawn. You want nice, parallel, alternating stripes.

To accomplish that, you need to know the location of the mower throughout the process so you can keep track of areas that have been cut, and so you can cut the grass in a specific manner. Back and forth stripes, for example, or perhaps a nice circular spiral moving outward from a tree.

I’ve come to the conclusion that to really automate the mowing process, you need at least +/-1in of positioning accuracy. Historically, such a system required a $40,000 survey grade GPS system from Trimble or Leica and the equivalent of a master’s degree in computer engineering to integrate it into your robot.

So the Roomba mower guys, given these constraints, came up with the following solution:

Who cares where the mower is? Just fence it in and have it mow all the time. You’ll eventually cut all the grass. We gotta make a product that we can realistically sell to people at a profit, you know.

-Some engineering manager out at Roomba Mowers Inc, I’m guessing

Every robot mower has to compete with the neighbor kid that will mow your lawn for $20. He’ll even try to make the stripes in the front lawn mostly straight and parallel. That’s the price point and level of quality that you have to beat with any robotic mowing system.

The Roomba mower guys sacrificed quality and scalability to get there with their system. Those are probably decent tradeoffs if we’re honest. While these Roomba mowers are for the most part a novelty, for some folks they work okay. But in the scenarios where they do perform well, they’re probably not value added at their $2,000+ price point.

So for years, guys like me that dreamed of real robot lawn mowers were left with just that: dreams. I don’t have $40,000 laying around, and I’m a mechanical engineer, not a hardware guy or a computer engineer. And even if I had both of those things, such a system can never turn a profit in the market place.

Enter u-Blox with the ZED-F9P module….

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